5. Voting and Community Engagement

Disability awareness and education

The public needs to have a better understanding of disabilities. In order for our culture to become more accepting and less afraid of people with disabilities, they need to be better educated. It would be nice if there was an organization whose sole purpose was to enlighten businesses and provide support to them in becoming truly integrated. It would also be nice if the government gave some sort of incentive for businesses ...more »

Submitted by (@smislow)

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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

7 Amazing Actions for Teachers to Take

Without a doubt, all teachers definitely have the power to make change on behalf of exceptional children and youth, as well as their families and peers. However, they cannot make such astounding impacts without significant support, as well as full knowledge regarding not only their specialty subjects, but also their character traits, their practices, and their students. I have seven suggestions for teachers to use to ...more »

Submitted by (@reese306)

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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Title 130

Great urban ideas. If you've ever flown from DC to the west coast all that landscape you cross over is agricultural. Remember some kids may want to learn skills that apply to the family business. Since the Clinton administration the Pell Grant covers the tuition of vocational training. Besides learning vocational skills may assist our young adults if their chosen profession fail them.

Submitted by (@scotth)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Reframing what "work" means

I have lots of disabilities and my parents were told I would never work - that I'd be in an institution. Too often adults/teachers/providers define work based on their generation and like to tell youth that their career dreams are unrealistic. Well, if you reframe or redefine work based on today's possibilities, you can easily see that our dreams are not realistic but very possible. I own my own dog boarding business. ...more »

Submitted by (@brooke94)

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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Behavioral challenges vs. disability

Most of the people classified as special education don't have disabilities, but rather, behavioral challenges. They are taken out of classrooms rather than being given necessary socioemotional supports to learn how to express emotions and deal with frustrations. This is especially challenging for kids who don't see that modeled at home. There is a study happening in Chicago about mindfulness whose implications should ...more »

Submitted by (@aditij)

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4. Advocacy and Self-Advocacy for Everyday Life

A 9-step Process for Exceptional Self-Advocacy

The whole purpose of self-advocacy is to stand up for yourself and take ownership of everything in your life under any circumstance. A philosophy that I recommend for self-advocates of any background, age, etc. is to consistently take inventory of everything that happens in daily life and to dig deep. For example, if a man with Asperger's Syndrome has trouble with relationships, he could conduct some research using ...more »

Submitted by (@reese306)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Community/representation

To the extent that people with disabilities are portrayed in the media, most people are white and have a developmental disability. I have epilepsy and am a POC, I've never seen a POC with a disability working a professional job on tv. I'm in law school and don't know of any organizations for people with disabilities in the law. It helps to have role models and know what you aspire to is possible.

Submitted by (@aditij)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Vocational Rehabilitation

Vocational Rehabilitation agencies vary in each state. With new legislation, they are required to begin services with individuals with disabilities as early as 14 years old. At one VR in Georgia, they have implemented Job Club which allows a VR Counselor to come into the high schools in that county. That VR Counselor is responsible for introducing ideas such as budgeting, interviewing skills, do's and don'ts in the work ...more »

Submitted by (@lauren.jones)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Inclusive Apprenticeships

Apprenticeship programs are jobs that youth with disabilities could enroll in to earn money while developing their skills in a field of interest to them. Programs typically last a few years, and apprentices who complete them earn an average starting salary of $50,000 a year. Historically, there have been many programs in fields like construction and manufacturing, but recently there has been a lot of growth in industries ...more »

Submitted by (@oltremare)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Online internet Resources to Prepare for Work

The internet can be used as a tool that can access resources for anyone removing barrier to access some individuals with disabilities can have. There needs to be well developed websites and web videos about preparation for transition to the workforce. Some examples: How to fill out a job application, How to dress for an interview, How to communicate in a interview etc. There needs to be more internet outreach in all ...more »

Submitted by (@angie4dolls)

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