3. Health & Healthcare Access

Medically Accurate Information

What can we do as a community to promote medically accurate healthcare information so that people with all different disabilities are getting informed and educated information? I hear a lot of myths about people with disabilities not being interested in health, reproduction, sexuality, etc - and that is why the information is not being provided or promoted.

Submitted by (@rkaplan)

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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

scotth

Here in Washington State standardized testing is used to evaluate teacher performance. This is suppose to weed out inept teachers. What happens is the teachers are teaching the test. Children are not instructed in subjects that lead to nationalism, community involvement, or how our economy works. A lot of the children I've spoken with are sure there is going to be another depression so why bother. I placate their parents ...more »

Submitted by (@scotth)

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3. Health & Healthcare Access

Aim for the Highest Quality for All Types of Health

When we think health or healthcare, we usually think of physical health and dieting. As important as this matter is, there are many other types of health that are equally, if not more crucial than physical. Here is a list of personal types of health: 1. Mental Health 2. Social Health 3. Emotional Health 4. Spiritual Health 5. Physical Health Of course, there are dozens of other categories to address as well. For example, ...more »

Submitted by (@reese306)

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6. Taking Care of Daily Life & Supports

Addressing Barriers to Independence

Find out what resources are available to enhance independence. For example, some people with disabilities may be eligible for Personal Care Assistance, special transportation, etc. Also look into what assistive technology could help.

Submitted by (@familyvoicesnj)

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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Title 130

I've spent four years as a sub para ed in a school district with 13 elementary, 6 middle and 5 high schools. I've worked in DD programs and resource rooms. Pulling a K-6 child out of class to help them with sight words and math helps the child become successful.Otherwise the child could fail and fall behind. If you want to change something forget the way math is taught. I've seena middle school math teacher attempt to ...more »

Submitted by (@scotth)

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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Systemic Implementation of Universal Design for Learning

Disclosure and self-advocacy are important skills for youth with disabilities to manage, but the reality is that many will go through school and work without requesting the accommodations they need to be successful. To engage all learners (including but not limited to those with disabilities), school personnel, employers, and other caring adults can support the systemic implementation of Universal Design for Learning ...more »

Submitted by (@oltremare)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Reframing what "work" means

I have lots of disabilities and my parents were told I would never work - that I'd be in an institution. Too often adults/teachers/providers define work based on their generation and like to tell youth that their career dreams are unrealistic. Well, if you reframe or redefine work based on today's possibilities, you can easily see that our dreams are not realistic but very possible. I own my own dog boarding business. ...more »

Submitted by (@brooke94)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Youth Advocacy

Do you think that youth understand how to explain their disability to their employer? If so, can they communicate their needs?

Submitted by (@andrea5)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Community/representation

To the extent that people with disabilities are portrayed in the media, most people are white and have a developmental disability. I have epilepsy and am a POC, I've never seen a POC with a disability working a professional job on tv. I'm in law school and don't know of any organizations for people with disabilities in the law. It helps to have role models and know what you aspire to is possible.

Submitted by (@aditij)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

former VRC

Here in Washington State our precious Governor gutted social services. More than one generation of children were insufficiently transitioned. I know this first hand. After High School my step sun attended Job Corps at Tongue Point in Oregon. High School, DVR, and Job Corps never gave him a clinical psych eval. Ian waited a year for the position at Job Corps. He never got the placement or any of the four alternatives. ...more »

Submitted by (@scotth)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

More services for adults with disabilities

As a person with a disability I have noticed many young adults with disabilities are being tossed aside after they walk across the stage and get their diploma or certificate from the principal. Many are put into SSI by their parents because they are having problems finding jobs on their own. Something their own parents and teachers should be TEACHING THEM TO DO! I see so many people onSSI who are not supposed to be there, ...more »

Submitted by (@nathanarezzo1)

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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Networking and Mentoring for Disable People

There should be more networking events exclusively designed for people with disabilities and disability employers. There also should be a mentorship program where people with disabilities can get advice from a professional.

Submitted by (@jaywu32)

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