2. Preparing for the Workforce

Community/representation

To the extent that people with disabilities are portrayed in the media, most people are white and have a developmental disability. I have epilepsy and am a POC, I've never seen a POC with a disability working a professional job on tv. I'm in law school and don't know of any organizations for people with disabilities in the law. It helps to have role models and know what you aspire to is possible.

Submitted by (@aditij)

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5 votes
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2. Preparing for the Workforce

Training for Supervisors

I think it would be helpful to have agencies offer trainings gear towards supervising someone with a disability. I've run into a few situations with consumers where the supervisor is not fully aware of what is covered in ADA Title 1 for Employment. To my knowledge there isn't really anything that exists like that.

Submitted by (@hlong5)

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3 votes
3 up votes
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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Life outside of the K-12 system

Transition planning is critical, but often does not include organizational representatives who can continue to support a youth after K-12. When the re-authorization of I.D.E.A. begins to move forward I would like to see language in it that includes that community based organizations, such as Centers for Independent Living, must be invited to attend to support the youth and family throughout their transition out of K-12. ...more »

Submitted by (@christina)

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9 votes
10 up votes
1 down votes
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6. Taking Care of Daily Life & Supports

Having a Mental Health Disability and Balancing a Career

I graduated with a Master degree in Social Work a year ago now after battling my mental health disability over the past 8 years while earning two degrees. I started my own program before finishing my Master. Now I have a federal job as an Office Automation Assistant. I encourage all who are earning degrees to plan ahead before walking across the stage. Don't just dream of the job be working on that all along the way. ...more »

Submitted by (@kionia27)

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2 votes
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6. Taking Care of Daily Life & Supports

Making More Home and Commujnity Based Services Available

Home and Community Based services :housing, employment, personal attendant services, health care is important for individuals with disabilities to have a successful transition. There are too many barriers like underfunding and waitlist that make these services difficult to obtain. Government Agencies like Administration for Community Living (part of Department of Health And Humans Services) Centers for Medicare and Medicaid ...more »

Submitted by (@angie4dolls)

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2 votes
2 up votes
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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Exceptional Students Can Become Exceptional, too! Here's How.

When most people think of children/youth with disabilities, the first things that come to mind are bullying, special ed, accommodations, and isolation, just to name a few. While these certainly happen more frequently than anyone desires, the exceptional student can chart his own path to personal and professional success, even without a lot of aid, using a strategy like this: 1. A high school student starts his/her school ...more »

Submitted by (@reese306)

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4 votes
4 up votes
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1. Learning in High School & Beyond

Inclusive Education = having a better life after school

So many schools are preparing kids to be great group home residents or segregated workshop employment. It is a great disservice and there's data to back up (more inclusion = more employment, independence, community involvement). The first step to quality transition to adult life is access to and participation in a quality general education program. CLOSE ALL CENTER PROGRAMS NOW! If this "continuum " is an option, ...more »

Submitted by (@emilime)

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8 votes
8 up votes
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4. Advocacy and Self-Advocacy for Everyday Life

Parental and School Education/Advocacy

I'm coming at this from a mental health angle, but teaching parents and schools to look for the warning signs of mental illness. It's not all angst and doesn't come from bullying. Have awareness days with more guidance counselor involvement, especially to both parents and educators, is great advocacy.

Submitted by (@srosenblatt)

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4 votes
4 up votes
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5. Voting and Community Engagement

Using the word disability

I feel like it's time to remove the word disability someone who disability can still live a normal life and get a job how would you feel if someone called you disability?? Think before you speak we are humans too describing someone as disability can really hurt someone feelings

Submitted by (@dorythefish1)

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8 votes
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